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  • Partnering on survivorship programs

    Cancer patients and their families living on Chicago’s West and South Sides now have access to free supportive therapy and survivorship programs close to home, thanks to a collaboration between Wellness House and the UI Cancer Center. More...

  • Art helping those with memory loss

    Individuals with memory loss and their care partners are finding a way to express their creativity thanks to a partnership between the University of Illinois at Springfield and Southern Illinois University. More...

  • Engineering muscle in the lab

    Growing muscle tissue on grooved platforms helps neurons more effectively integrate with the muscle, a requirement for engineering muscle in the lab that responds and functions like muscle in the body,  Urbana-Champaign researchers found in a new study.

  • Using graphene to detect ALS

    Graphene may one day be used to test for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS — a progressive, neurodegenerative disease which is diagnosed mostly by ruling out other disorders, according to new research from the University of Illinois at Chicago. More...

  • New drug seeks receptors in sarcoma cells

    A new compound that targets a receptor within sarcoma cancer cells shrank tumors and hampered their ability to spread in mice and pigs, a study from researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign reports. More...

  • Fruit as potential cancer treatment

    A  $1.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute will enable researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago to study the mangosteen fruit and its potential as a treatment for prostate cancer. More...

  • Single-cell RNA sequencing

    A UIC laboratory adapted a technology called Drop-seq, which allows researchers to isolate and genetically sequence single cells. Drop-seq can sequence thousands of individual cells at the same time. More...

  • Epilepsy & reproductive cycle

    Researchers in Urbana-Champaign have found that neurons regulating hormone release have different activity in mice with epilepsy, and that those differences fluctuate with the reproductive cycle. More...

  • Building library of bacteria

    Approximately $1.7 million in new funding from the National Institutes of Health will enable a multidisciplinary team of UIC researchers to build a reference library of bacteria to help scientists quickly identify bacterial strains and analyze their disease-fighting potential. More...

  • Tissue-imaging technology

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers developed a tissue-imaging microscope that can image living tissue in real time and molecular detail, allowing them to monitor tumors and their environments as cancer progresses. More...

  • Health conditions in Ghana

    A group of UIS students and faculty members conducted research in Ghana, West Africa as part of an international study abroad trip. The group is investigating the prevalence and risk factors several health conditions among the Ghanaian population, as well as assessing water quality. More...

  • Reducing opioid overdoses

    A UIC researcher says most opioid-related overdose deaths in Illinois are caused by heroin use, often in combination with potent synthetic opioids. The university is working with the Illinois Department of Human Services to gain a better understanding of the state's opioid crisis. More...

  • Targeting spinal-column tumors

    Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago report in the journal PLOS ONE, that by adding magnetic particles to surgical cement used to heal spinal fractures, they could guide magnetic nanoparticles directly to lesions near the fractures. More...

  • Insulin-secreting cell transplants

    A drug-carrying microsphere within a cell-bearing microcapsule could be the key to transplanting insulin-secreting pig pancreas cells into human patients whose own cells have been destroyed by type I diabetes. More...

  • Response to depression treatment

    Researchers from UIC report that they can help clinicians determine whether a patient with anxiety or depression is responding to treatment and if they will do better on an antidepressant drug, or in talk therapy using EEG. More...